Advisory Board http://eineps.org Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:23:55 +0000 en-gb Bernard LaFayette, Jr http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/39-bernard-lafayette-jr http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/39-bernard-lafayette-jr

Rev. Dr. Bernard LaFayette, Jr. has been a Civil Rights Movement activist, minister, educator, lecturer, and is an authority on the strategy on nonviolent social change. From the time he co-founded the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960, he was a leader of the Nashville Movement, the Freedom Rides, and Selma Movement. An ordained minister, Dr. LaFayette earned his B.A. from the American Baptist Theological Seminary in Nashville, Tennessee, and his Ed.M. and Ed.D from Harvard University. 

Dr. LaFayette is currently a Distinguished-Scholar-in-Residence and Director of the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies at the University of Rhode Island. He is the chairperson for the International Nonviolence Executive Planning Board. He has been re-appointed by Rhode Island Governor Donald Carcieri as the chairman for the Rhode Island Select Commission on Race and Police-Community Relations. He is a native of Tampa, Florida. 

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Advisory Board Wed, 08 Aug 2012 06:46:36 +0000
Haile Gerima http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/41-haile-gerima http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/41-haile-gerima

Prof. Haile Gerima came to the US to study acting and directing at The Goodman Theater in Chicago. He later transferred to the Theater Department at UCLA where he completed the Master's Program in Film. Afterwards, he relocated to Washington, D.C. to teach at Howard University's Department of Radio, Television, and Film where he has influenced young filmmakers for over twenty-five years. 

Influenced by UCLA classmate & filmmaker Charles Burnett, and by the celebrated Black poet and educator Sterling Brown, Gerima's films are noted for their exploration of the issues and history pertinent to members of the African Diaspora from the continent itself to the Americas and Western Hemisphere. Often corrective of Hollywood versions of slave stories, his films comment on the physical, cultural, and psychological dislocation of Black peoples during and after slavery. 

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Advisory Board Wed, 08 Aug 2012 06:48:16 +0000
Omara Otunnu http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/40-omara-otunnu http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/40-omara-otunnu

Prof. Omara Otunnu is the first and to date the only holder of a UNESCO Chair in Human Rights in the United States of America and Coordinator of UNESCO Chairs in Human Rights in the region that comprises Israel, Western Europe and North America. He is the founder and Executive Director of the Institute of Comparative Human Rights at the University of Connecticut. 

In addition to his tenured position teaching history at the University of Connecticut, he also serves as Executive Director of the UConn-ANC Partnership, which consists of three projects: comparative human rights, oral history, and archives, and has received funding from the Mellon Foundation; and he leads the University of Connecticut-University of Fort Hare (South Africa) international linkage, as its director.

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Advisory Board Wed, 08 Aug 2012 06:48:04 +0000
Wole Soyinka http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/44-wole-soyinka http://eineps.org/index.php/about-us/our-people/adisory-board/item/44-wole-soyinka

Wole SoyinkaProf. Wole Soyinka is a Nigerian playwright, poet, novelist, and critic, first black African who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1986. Soyinka has been imprisoned several times for his criticism of the government. From the 1970s he has lived long periods in exile. Soyinka's plays range from comedy to tragedy, and from political satire to the theatre of the absurd. He has combined influences from Western traditions with African myth, legends and folklore, and such techniques as singing and drumming. His first important play, A Dance of the Forests, in the late 1950s satirizes the fledgling nation by showing that the present is no more a golden age than was the past. Soyinka sometimes writes of modern West Africa in a satirical style, but his serious intent and his belief in the evils inherent in the exercise of power are usually present in his work.

Soyinka’s passion for the written word stems from his childhood in Abeokuta, Western Nigeria, where he was inspired by his “long family of word-spinners” from whom he also “imbibed” his sense of justice. Educated at nearby University College, Ibadan, and at the University of Leeds in the UK, in 1960 Soyinka returned to Nigeria after six years in England to pursue his career as an author, professor and human rights activist.

An outspoken critic of Nigeria’s past tyrannies, Soyinka has spent long periods of his life in exile. His Poems from Prison (1969) and The Man Died: Prison Notes (1972) describe his 27 months in a Nigerian prison, and his play, King Baabu (2001) satirises African dictatorships. “If the spirit of African democracy has a voice and a face, they belong to Wole Soyinka,” said the New York Times.

Soyinka’s latest work, You Must Set Forth at Dawn (2006), depicts his adult life and opposition to Nigeria’s corrupt regimes. The memoir follows on from his autobiography, Aké: The Years of Childhood (1981), and a long string of masterpieces written over a half-century.Soyinka is emeritus professor at Obafemi Awolowo University in Nigeria, President’s Professor at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, and non-resident fellow at the Du Bois Institute, Harvard University. While encouraging young writers to look within their own cultures for idioms of expression

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Advisory Board Wed, 08 Aug 2012 06:54:07 +0000